All things environmental

Musings about the environment and all it touches, from education to city planning

The laneway homes of Trout Lake

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Here’s one of the newer laneway house, behind Garden Drive in Vancouver. Nice big windows. Who’s want that in a lane? Unless you have a view of a park. This is an example of former mayor Sam Sullivan’s eco-density concept: increased densification, increased housing, without compromising liveability.

Here’s one of the newer laneway house, behind Garden Drive in Vancouver. Nice big windows. Who’d want that in a lane? Unless you have a view of a park. This is an example of former mayor Sam Sullivan’s eco-density concept: increased densification, increased housing, without compromising liveability.

Here’s another, one of the older ones, behind 13th avenue. Windows, too. South facing, it gets lots of light because it’s looking at John Hendry Park – commonly known as Trout Lake. The surprise is that there are actually so few of them, in such a nice setting.

Here’s another, one of the older ones, behind 13th avenue. Windows, too. South facing, it gets lots of light because it’s looking at John Hendry Park – commonly known as Trout Lake. The surprise is that there are actually so few of them, in such a nice setting.

The park is actually surrounded by lanes on three of its sides. I counted 45 lots on the lanes facing the park (and there are many other lanes in Vancouver facing parks or open spaces). Why aren’t there more of them? Maybe many of the owners consider it complicated and risky to built laneway homes.

The park is actually surrounded by lanes on three of its sides. I counted 45 lots on the lanes facing the park (and there are many other lanes in Vancouver facing parks or open spaces). Why aren’t there more of them? Maybe many of the owners consider it complicated and risky to built laneway homes.

This backyard, next door to the first laneway house above, may give a hint. It’s large, a tad neglected, a perfect image of the east side in the old days. I actually really like it. It could be that the owner doesn’t want the expense of building, nor the bother of renting, a laneway house. But maybe if they could sell part of their lot to a developer of a laneway house, they would do it; but that’s against city rules. C’mon, Vancouver: this would be an easy way to promote new housing.

This backyard, next door to the first laneway house above, may give a hint. It’s large, a tad neglected, a perfect image of the east side in the old days. I actually really like it. It could be that the owner doesn’t want the expense of building, nor the bother of renting, a laneway house. But maybe if they could sell part of their lot to a developer of a laneway house, they would do it; but that’s against city rules. C’mon, Vancouver: this would be an easy way to promote new housing.

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Written by enviropaul

January 14, 2017 at 11:52 am

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